Wellspring of Life

One of the great misconceptions of the Christian life is that our lives are guided by our intellectual beliefs. In reality, we are guided by our hearts, which act like a well and a compass. The surest way to know the direction of your life is to look, honestly at critically, at your own heart. This series will let us look together and invite us to be shaped into the image of Jesus.

One of the great misconceptions of the Christian life is that our lives are guided by our intellectual beliefs. In reality, we are guided by our hearts, which act like a well and a compass. The surest way to know the direction of your life is to look, honestly at critically, at your own heart. This series will let us look together and invite us to be shaped into the image of Jesus.

Sunday's sermon was unfortunately not recorded due to technical difficulties. The above sermon is from our sister church, Trinity Grace Park Slope, framing this new teaching series. 

Sunday's sermon was unfortunately not recorded due to technical difficulties. The above sermon is from our sister church, Trinity Grace Park Slope, framing this new teaching series. 

Three Pillars

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Every Body of Believers shares a common call of becoming the Body of Christ with Jesus, Himself, as the head authority.  Every Body of Believers also shares a unique call, particular to time and place.  As we move into a new chapter in the life of our church, building on our existing foundation, we are asking the question of our unique call:  “Who is the unique church God has called us to be?”  This teaching series highlights the 3 Pillars Trinity Grace Church Williamsburg is built on, giving us form and structure: Formative Encounter, Merciful Presence, and Pilgrim Community.

Advent 2016

Advent takes us back and brings us forward. In preparing us to celebrate Christ’s first coming, it places us alongside the ancient prophets, who awaited with aching intensity the fulfilled promise of a messiah, and Joseph and Mary, whose pregnancy made the expectation all the more palpable; it also strengthens our longing for Christ’s second coming, when he will return to fully and finally establish his kingdom on earth. Thus, Advent is a season of waiting and rejoicing.   It is an intentional season waiting, identifying with the longing of previous generations, stirring our own hope. It is also a season of rejoicing, celebrating the revelation of Jesus reconciling us to God.  The birth of Jesus was announced by a host of angels making the declaration, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people.”  During Advent particularly, we join that declaration.

Advent takes us back and brings us forward. In preparing us to celebrate Christ’s first coming, it places us alongside the ancient prophets, who awaited with aching intensity the fulfilled promise of a messiah, and Joseph and Mary, whose pregnancy made the expectation all the more palpable; it also strengthens our longing for Christ’s second coming, when he will return to fully and finally establish his kingdom on earth. Thus, Advent is a season of waiting and rejoicing.  

It is an intentional season waiting, identifying with the longing of previous generations, stirring our own hope. It is also a season of rejoicing, celebrating the revelation of Jesus reconciling us to God.  The birth of Jesus was announced by a host of angels making the declaration, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people.”  During Advent particularly, we join that declaration.

Who Do You Say I Am?

Ephesians 3 calls the church, “the manifold wisdom of God made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms,” but the very few people, inside or outside of the modern church, would describe their experience in those terms.  In modern culture, the church has lost its intrinsic value.  This teaching series is about regaining Jesus’ vision for the church.  He asked his disciples, “Who do you say I am?” when Peter first identified him as the Messiah.  We, as the church, are asking that question of Jesus, “Who do you say we are?”  Each sermon in this series explores one of the primary biblical metaphors used to identify the church.

Ephesians 3 calls the church, “the manifold wisdom of God made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms,” but the very few people, inside or outside of the modern church, would describe their experience in those terms.  In modern culture, the church has lost its intrinsic value.  This teaching series is about regaining Jesus’ vision for the church.  He asked his disciples, “Who do you say I am?” when Peter first identified him as the Messiah.  We, as the church, are asking that question of Jesus, “Who do you say we are?”  Each sermon in this series explores one of the primary biblical metaphors used to identify the church.

Revive Us Again

This teaching series takes a look at accounts of great spiritual awaking in the Scriptures—Revivals led by Elijah, Jacob, Asa, and many others.  These revivals serve as clear examples of what God can, and even longs, to do in our time and place.

This teaching series takes a look at accounts of great spiritual awaking in the Scriptures—Revivals led by Elijah, Jacob, Asa, and many others.  These revivals serve as clear examples of what God can, and even longs, to do in our time and place.

Due to technical difficulties, the sermons from August 7, August 21, and September 4 were not able to be recorded.

The Way of Love

“The Way of Love” is a teaching series focused on knowing, understanding, and loving one another well through life stages - Marriage, Singleness, Friendship, and Parenting. After a seven week series focuses on the presence and power of God through the gift of the Holy Spirit, we turn our focus to relationship because, as the Apostle Paul points out, "If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.  If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.  If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:1-3).    

“The Way of Love” is a teaching series focused on knowing, understanding, and loving one another well through life stages - Marriage, Singleness, Friendship, and Parenting. After a seven week series focuses on the presence and power of God through the gift of the Holy Spirit, we turn our focus to relationship because, as the Apostle Paul points out, "If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.  If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.  If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:1-3).  

 

In Your Midst

Most of us believe that Easter is a one day event, but the book of Acts states that between Jesus’ resurrection and ascension, “He appeared to them over a period of 40 days and spoke about the Kingdom of God” (Acts 1:3).  During his ministry, Jesus spoke about the Kingdom of God through Parables:  Stories that gave earthly pictures to heavenly realities.  For 40 days, as a church we will explore Jesus’ parables, allowing them to shape our vision of His Kingdom.

Most of us believe that Easter is a one day event, but the book of Acts states that between Jesus’ resurrection and ascension, “He appeared to them over a period of 40 days and spoke about the Kingdom of God” (Acts 1:3).  During his ministry, Jesus spoke about the Kingdom of God through Parables:  Stories that gave earthly pictures to heavenly realities.  For 40 days, as a church we will explore Jesus’ parables, allowing them to shape our vision of His Kingdom.

Converting the Church

Matthew 23 records some of the hardest truth spoken by Jesus, which was directed at the Pharisees.  We spend the season of Lent exploring the idea that it is not only those outside the confines of religious practice who are in need of “converting.”  Often, it is those inside the walls of the church, but who have lost the heart of the story, that Jesus is calling into His Kingdom.

Matthew 23 records some of the hardest truth spoken by Jesus, which was directed at the Pharisees.  We spend the season of Lent exploring the idea that it is not only those outside the confines of religious practice who are in need of “converting.”  Often, it is those inside the walls of the church, but who have lost the heart of the story, that Jesus is calling into His Kingdom.